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Vyatta NOS documentation

Learn how to install, configure, and operate Vyatta Network Operating System (Vyatta NOS), which helps to drive our virtual networking and physical platforms portfolio.

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Installation and Upgrade Commands

This section gives the commands necessary to install and upgrade the Vyatta NOS hard disks and persistent devices.

add system image: <iso-filename> | <iso-URL> [ username <username> password <password>]

Adds a binary system image to the currently running system.

<iso-filename>
Name of the image file to be added.
<iso-url>
URL location of the image file to be added.
username <username>
Specifies the username that is required to log in to the remote system at the indicated URL location.
password <password>
Specifies the password that is required to log in to the remote system at the indicated URL location. If the username is specified, then a password must also be specified.

Operational mode

Use this command to add a binary image to the currently running system. A system image can be added to a system that was installed by using a disk-based installation or an image-based installation. After an image is added, it is set as the new default boot image and is run the next time the system is booted.

The command validates the MD5 checksums of the files that are contained in the ISO image to ensure that the image has not been corrupted. In addition, the command does not allow more than one copy of an image to exist on the same system.

The iso-filename and iso-URL arguments provide the source for the ISO image file.

Table 1. Specifying the file syntax for different file locations
Location Specification

An absolute path

For iso-filename, use standard UNIX file specification.

A relative path

For iso-filename, you can also specify the path name relative to the current directory.

FTP server

Use the following syntax for the iso-URL argument:

ftp://user:passwd@host/image-file

where user is the username on the host, passwd is the password that is associated with the username, host is the host name or IP address of the FTP server, and image-file is the ISO image file, including the path. Alternatively, the username and password can be specified as username and password arguments of add system image .

If you do not specify user and passwd, you are prompted for them.

SCP server

Use the following syntax for the iso-URL argument:

scp://user:passwd@host/image-file

where user is the username on the host, passwd is the password that is associated with the username, host is the host name or IP address of the SCP server, and image-file is the ISO image file, including the path. Alternatively, the username and password can be specified as username and password arguments to add system image .

If you do not specify user and passwd, you are prompted for them.

HTTP server

Use the following syntax for the iso-URL argument:

http://host/image-file

where host is the host name or IP address of the HTTP server and image-file is the ISO image file, including the path relative to the HTTP root directory.

TFTP server

Use the following syntax for the iso-URL argument:

tftp://host/image-file

where host is the host name or IP address of the TFTP server, and image-file is the ISO image file, including the path relative to the TFTP root directory.

clone system image: [ <user@host:>] <source-image-name> <new-image-name> [ clean ]

Creates a copy of a system image that is installed on the local system or a remote system.

<user>
Username on a remote host. A username is required for remote host access through SCP and is not required for cloning a local system image.
<host>
Host name or IP address of a remote host. The host name or IP address is required for remote access through SCP and is not required for cloning a local system image.
<source-image-name>
Name of a system image to be copied. The source image can exist on the local system or a remote system.
<new-image-name>
Name of the new (copied) system image. An image with this name must not exist on the system.
clean
Creates an empty read/write directory tree for the new image, which is a new image that is functionally equivalent to the source image as it existed when it was originally installed.

Operational mode

Use this command to create a copy of a system image that is installed on the local system or a remote system.

If user@host is specified, the image is fetched from the named host by using the Secure Copy Protocol (SCP). If user@host is omitted source-image-name is the name of an image that exists on the system, and new-image-name is the image name that the system uses for the clone. No image that is named source-image-name can exist on the system.

Command completion is performed for local image names if user@host is not specified. No command completion is performed on remote image names if user@host is specified.

If the clean argument is omitted, the command copies the squashfs file that is being used by the image named source-image-name and the read/write directory tree of source-image-name. If the clean argument is given, the read/write directory tree of source-image-name is not copied. Instead, an empty read/write directory tree is created for the new image, which creates a new image that is functionally equivalent to the source image as it existed when it was initially installed.

Images created by this command behave the same as images that are installed by install image or add system image.

Both the HTTPS and SSH services must be enabled on the remote system for clone system image to work properly. The HTTPS service is enabled by using set service https in configuration mode. The SSH service is enabled by using set service ssh in configuration mode.

delete system image: <image-name>

Deletes an image from the local disk drive.

When the command is entered without an image name the system prompts for the image to delete.

<image-name>
Name of an image to be deleted.

Operational mode

Use this command to delete an image from the local disk drive.

The image and all its local files, including its configuration file, are destroyed. Because this command is destructive the system prompts for confirmation.

Command completion displays all valid completions for the image-name argument. If the image-name argument is omitted the system displays a list of available images and prompts you to select one.

If the system was originally installed in disk-based mode, an image-name option is available that you can use to direct that the disk-based installation must be deleted.

The system does not allow you to delete the currently running system image. However, the system does allow you to delete the image currently selected to be run at the next reboot. If you delete that image, the system uses the currently running image when the system is next rebooted.

install image

Installs a binary image of the system.

install image

Operational mode

Use this command to install a binary image of the system.

After the installation is completed you can add multiple image versions to the same partition by using add system image, and you can then choose which version to boot by using set system image default-boot. This functionality allows you to move easily between different versions of the system.

If you have a new system and want to install from scratch, you can boot LiveCD or LiveUSB and run install image to install the image on LiveCD or LiveUSB to the disk. install image operates similarly to install system —it creates and formats a new disk partition and then installs the image to the partition while preserving the system configuration.

rename system image: <old-image-name> <new-image-name>

Renames an image.

<old-image-name>
Name of an existing image to be renamed.
<new-image-name>
New name for the image.

Operational mode

Use this command to rename an image.

The old name must match the name of an image on the system. The system does not allow you to rename the currently running system image. The new system image name cannot be in use by another image.

set system image default-boot: <image-name>

Selects an image to be run when the system is next rebooted.

If the command is used without specifying an image name, the system displays a list of available images and prompts you to select one.

<image-name>
Name of an image to be run when the system is rebooted.

Operational mode

Use this command to select an image to run when the system is next rebooted.

When multiple system images have been installed by using add system image, you can use this command to direct the system to boot from a specific system image the next time the system is restarted.

Command completion displays all valid completions for the image-name argument. If the image-name argument is omitted, the system displays a list that shows all images that are installed on the system and prompts you to select one. If the system was originally installed in disk-based mode, a special image-name option is available so that you can select the disk-based system as the default system from which to boot.

show system image: [ storage | version ]

Displays a list of all images that are installed on the system.

show system image [ storage | version ]
storage
Displays the amount of disk space that is used by each image.
version
Includes the image version number in the display of system images.

Operational mode

Use this command to display a list of all images that are installed on the system.

The command output identifies the image that is currently running and the image that has been selected to run when the system is next rebooted. If the system was originally installed in disk-based mode, one of the image names identifies that installation.

spawn: <command-name> [ <text> ]

Allows you to run any native Linux command through the operational mode infrastructure.

<command-name>
Command to run.
<text>
An argument to a command.

Operational mode

Use this command to run any native Linux command through the operational mode infrastructure.

Commands that are spawned are run by the local shell, and with the current user's permissions. The spawned command provides a documented and supported way of running any Linux command.

The spawned command prevents any changes to the set of modeled commands from effecting the user's ability to run native commands consistently, if they are using this supported method.